Limerick 2022 budget special meeting on March 23

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In a special meeting convened by Zoom on March 23 at 12:30 p.m., Limerick Township Council discussed its draft 2022 budget. Victoria Tisdale, Clerk and Treasurer, presented the draft budget, which sparked board discussions and questions. Overall, this draft budget for 2022 would see a 0.4% increase in taxes for residents of Limerick Township. Even with the changes discussed at the meeting, Tisdale said any tax increase would likely be less than 1% when the final budget is presented at the April meeting.

Mayor Carl Stefanski introduced the 2022 draft budget discussion at the March 23 special meeting and invited Tisdale to introduce it. For expenses, she said council expenses for 2022 were estimated at $64,200, which is higher than the 2021 estimate but $12,962.54 more than the actual 2021 cost of $51,237.46. $. The board had a question about the $5,000 amount for hotels and conferences, and Tisdale responded that she estimated there would be at least one training seminar per board member over the coming year. , such as the AMO conference, where this estimate came from. Regarding a question about potential council members needing training, Councilor Kim Carson noted that these expenses would be budgeted for next year, while Stefanski added that the council briefing by Fred Dean and the introductory information binder that all new advisors receive should be enough to answer any questions and concerns.

Administrative expenses are estimated at $446,100 for 2022, which is higher than the 2021 estimate, but only $1,732.98 more than last year’s actual amount of $444,367.02. Councilor Glen Locke asked why the insurance had increased from $60,000 to $110,000, and Tisdale said that generally insurance had increased for all municipalities and would have a firm number when their insurance renewed in may. She said she would make sure their insurance provider was on the board to explain the increases in May.

Fire departments had an estimated expense of $161,300 in 2022, which is the same as the 2021 estimate, but is $15,167.87 more than the actual 2021 cost of $146,132.13. Tisdale said the position for salaries would actually be $34,000 versus $20,000 currently because they needed to incorporate a part-time administrator. She also said that Fire Chief Jason Gear had just purchased a rescue truck to replace the old one, so about $16,000 was taken from reserve contributions this year to offset that cost, so the post for Fire: Capital and Reserves shows $44,000 over usual. $60,000 withdrawn each year. The board discussed this and asked Tisdale to keep that amount at $60,000 to save money and possibly be able to replace the pump truck in five years, which would cost between $200,000 and $300,000.

The Crowe Valley Conservation Authority cost was $32,261.40 for 2022, which is $2,483.62 more than the 2021 estimate and actual cost. Councilor Jan MacKillican, who is vice-president of the CVCA, said the 10% increase was because their funding was cut by 50%. She pointed out that this was the first year in a long time with a significant increase in these dues. Due to the likely need for HVAC services with the Land’escapes and Limerick Lake Estates acreage, in his opinion this was money well spent.

Construction services were estimated at $25,000 for 2022, which is higher than the 2021 estimate and $3,206.73 more than the actual 2021 cost of $21,793.27. Frank Mills, the CBO, said last year was very crowded for permits, so he asked for more money this year. He predicts this will also be a busy year for permits, particularly with the upcoming Limerick Lake estates and Land’escapes acreage.

Animal control was estimated at $3,500 for 2022, 12 cents less than the actual 2021 cost, but $500 more than the estimated 2021 cost. Tisdale said it was primarily to trap beavers blocking the township culverts with their dams.

The estimated COVID-19 emergency measures costs for 2022 were $43,893.80, while the actual cost for 2021 was $10,106.20 and the estimated cost for 2021 was $54,000. Tisdale explained that it was the LCC generator as well as the municipal office generator upgrade. MacKillican asked if electronics for virtual meetings could be covered by this, to which Tisdale replied that they could and would consider doing so.

Enforcement, which is new to the township this year, would cost $16,800. Tisdale said the costs required identifiable clothing and magnetic signs for City Officer Cindy Fuerth’s vehicle so residents know who she is, as well as a computer for Fuerth to perform her duties.

Road expenses were estimated at $988,200 for 2022, while the actual 2021 cost was $1,336,863.61 and the 2021 estimate was $1,194,150. This year’s major projects will complete work on Old Hastings Road and begin work on Highway 620. For now, they will coat the surface of Highway 620 with tar and chip sealer as an interim measure, according to Public Works Supervisor Greg Maxwell, but it will have to be repaved in a few years. Tisdale said to repave they will look at grant funding options because it will be expensive.

MacKillican questioned the grader and pickup truck repair fund and why the amounts were so high when they had just been replaced. Maxwell replied that a big part of that cost was that he considered getting a fender for the grader to fend off snow banks. As for the pickup repair fund, the plow needed some repairs and since the truck was a 2015, it was prudent to have funds available for regular maintenance and unforeseen repair costs.

Disposal/recycling for 2022 was estimated at $136,000, while the actual amount for 2021 was $139,944.60 and the estimate for 2021 was $162,800. Tisdale told the board the biggest gap was for salaries and for a summer student last summer who was partially subsidized. She said a summer student again this summer at the landfill would be a good idea as it is very crowded in the summer for just one person. For item 16-4630 at $50,000, she said $40,000 was carried over from 2020 to fix the backhoe. She added that there were also additional costs incurred to replace items stolen from the landfill, such as the solar panel, inverter, generator and battery.

Health services are estimated to cost $1,700 for 2022, which is higher than the 2021 estimate and $117 more than the actual 2021 cost of $1,582.70. Tisdale says it’s for legislated water testing, so it’s mandatory. Testing is done twice a year at the municipal office and quarterly at the recreation center and then reported to the Hastings Prince Edward Health Unit.

Planning and development costs for 2022 are estimated at $6,500, which is more than the 2021 estimate and $498.80 more than the actual 2021 cost of $6,001.20.

“Most of those things are also reflected in revenue, so those are items that we end up paying to lawyers, but then we recover those costs from voters as they pay for their shoreline, rezoning, etc. So you will see the items but they are refunded,” she says.

The Limerick Community Center has an estimated cost of $31,500 for 2022, which is higher than the 2021 estimate, but $5,538.77 lower than the actual 2021 cost of $25,961.23. Tisdale said last year’s salary was $10,000 and they had someone to clean a lot due to COVID-19 sanitation protocols. She said they also held events and board meetings last year, a trend they hope to continue and grow in 2022.

Miscellaneous Services (which includes police fees, park upgrades, occupational health and safety, cannabis funding, website upgrades, library social programs, library upgrades, garage/ICIP office, contingent/unforeseen costs, 911, special capital/AODA, federal gas tax, lost appraisal decisions, capital upgrades, donations, election, bank reconciliation correction and other functional expenses) has a Estimated cost of $320,592.41 for 2022, which is lower than the 2021 estimate but $139,439.21 more than the actual 2021 cost of $181,153.20.

For revenue, the taxation will yield approximately $1,870,539.09, which is higher than the 2021 estimate and $34,255.67 more than the actual 2021 taxation reported of $1,836,283.42.

Miscellaneous Revenue (which includes General Miscellaneous, Tax Certificate, Library Funding, Grants/OMPF, Global Revenue, OCIF Formula, Good Food Box, COVID-19/Safe Restart Funding and boathouse registration) is approximately $511,531 for 2022, which is lower than the 2021 estimate, but is $12,258.66 more than the actual 2021 cost of 499,272.34 $.

Fire department revenue is estimated at $45,000 for 2022, which is lower than the 2021 estimate and $1,100 less than the actual 2021 revenue of $46,100. Tisdale said it was for the fire services agreement Limerick had with Tudor and Cashel Township.

Roads Department revenue is estimated at zero for 2022, less than estimated 2021 revenue and down from $86,066.43 in actual 2021 revenue.

Disposal/recycling revenue is estimated at $20,000 for 2022, which is the same as the 2021 estimate, but is $185.25 higher than the actual 2021 revenue of $19,814.75.

Building department revenue is estimated at $26,000 for 2022, higher than the 2021 estimate but less than $29,175 from actual 2021 revenue. Tisdale said building permits had been its biggest great source of revenue, at nearly three times what was budgeted.

Limerick Community Center revenue is estimated at $500 for 2022, which is the same as the 2021 estimate, but $400 more than the actual 2021 revenue.

Planning and development revenue for 2022 is estimated at $23,000, which is higher than the estimated 2021 revenue, but $7,298.89 lower than the actual 2021 revenue of $30,298.89.

Federal government grants (which also include gas tax, provincial government grants, and summer student scholarships) for 2022 are estimated at $121,946, which is lower than the estimated 2021 revenues, but $76,491.06 higher than actual 2021 earnings of $45,454.94.

Overall, the estimated total expenses for 2022 were $2,277,547.61, while the estimated revenues for that year were $978,236.51, with the 2020 payables amounting to $114,015.60. Therefore, the difference to be increased by taxes is $1,185,295.50, which equates to a tax increase of 0.4% for Limerick residents.

However, even with the changes discussed by the board at the March 23 meeting, Tisdale said the tax increase should still be less than 1%.

“I would highlight that [at the April council meeting] once I added them all for board approval.

Michael Riley, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, The Bancroft Times

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